Data Privacy Impact Assessments DPIA A key element of privacy by design

What needs to be contained in a DPIA ( Data Protection Impact Assessment) report?

What to include within a data Protection Impact Assessment

Article 35 (7) states that  The DPIA assessment shall contain at least:

(a) a systematic description of the envisaged processing operations and the purposes of the processing, including, where applicable, the legitimate interest pursued by the controller;

(b) an assessment of the necessity and proportionality of the processing operations in relation to the purposes;

(c) an assessment of the risks to the rights and freedoms of data subjects referred to in paragraph 1; and

(d) the measures envisaged to address the risks, including safeguards, security measures and mechanisms to ensure the protection of personal data and to demonstrate compliance with this Regulation taking into account the rights and legitimate interests of data subjects and other persons concerned.

Prior authorisation from a supervisory authority

Article 36 states that the controller shall consult the supervisory authority prior to processing where a data protection impact assessment under Article 35 indicates that the processing would result in a high risk in the absence of measures taken by the controller to mitigate the risk. Where the supervisory authority is of the opinion that the intended processing would infringe the GDPR, in particular where the controller has insufficiently identified or mitigated the risk, the supervisory authority shall, within period of up to eight weeks of receipt of the request for consultation, provide written advice to the controller and, where applicable to the processor.

Data protection by design and by default

A DPIA  should aim to instill the  data protection by design and default  principles.

Taking into account the state of the art, the cost of implementation and the nature, scope, context and purposes of processing as well as the risks for rights and freedoms of natural persons posed by the processing, the Controller shall, both at the time of the determination of the means for processing and at the time of the processing itself, implement appropriate technical and organisational measures, such as pseudonymisation.

The Controller shall implement appropriate technical and organisational measures for ensuring that, by default, only personal data which are necessary for each specific purpose of the processing are processed. That obligation applies to the amount of personal data collected, the extent of their processing, the period of their storage and their accessibility . In particular, such measures shall ensure that, by default, personal data are not made accessible without the individual’s intervention to an indefinite number of natural persons.

Such measures could consist, inter alia, of minimising the processing of personal data, pseudonymisation personal data as soon as possible, transparency with regard to the functions and processing of personal data, enabling the data subject to monitor the data processing, enabling the controller to create and improve security features. When developing, designing, selecting and using applications, services and products that are based on the processing of personal data or process personal data to fulfil their task, producers of the products, services and applications should be encouraged to take into account the right to data protection when developing and designing such products, services and applications and, with due regard to the state of the art, to make sure that controllers and processors are able to fulfil their data protection obligations.

If you would like to know how our service might enable your organisation’s GDPR compliance journey, please visit us here

Sharing is caring!

shares
error: Content is protected !!